programming

More chorus repetition macros for Audacity

In a previous post I described macros to support certain tasks in generating source material for L2 chorus repetition practice. Today, I’ll describe two other macros that automate this practice by slowing the playback speed of the repetition. Background I’ve described the rationale for chorus repetition practice in previous posts. The technique I describe here is to slow the sentence playback speed to give the learner time to build speed by practicing slower repetitions.

Audacity macros to support chorus repetition practice

Achieving fluid, native-quality speech in a second language is difficult task for adult learners. For several years, I’ve used Dr. Olle Kjellin’s method of “chorus repetition” for my Russian language study. In this post, I’m presenting a method for scripting Audacity to facilitate the development of audio source material to support his methodology. Background For detailed background on the methodology, I refer you to Kjellin’s seminal paper “Quality Practise Pronunciation with Audacity - The Best Method!

Scripting Apple Music on macOS for chorus repetition practice

This is an update to my previous post on automating iTunes on macOS to support chorus repetition practice. You can read the original post for the theory behind the idea; but in short, one way of developing prosody and quality pronunciation in a foreign language is to do mass repetitions in chorus with a recording of a native speaker. Because in macOS 10.15, iTunes is no more, I’ve updated the script to work with the new Music app.

Sunday, September 16, 2018

Regex 101 is a great online regex tester. Speaking of regular expressions, for the past year, I’ve used an automated process for building Anki flash cards. One of the steps in the process is to download Russian word pronunciations from Wiktionary. When Wiktionary began publishing transcoded mp3 files rather than just ogg files, they broke the URL scheme that I relied on to download content. The new regex for this scheme is: (?

ESP32, DS18B20, TM1637 integration: Displaying temperature data

In a previous post I wrote about displaying arbitrary data on a TM1637-based 4 digit LED display, highlighting an ESP-IDF component that I extended to display positive and negative floating point numbers. Now we’re going to put that component to use and display actual data from a DS18B20 temperature sensor. The {% asset_link DS18B20.pdf “DS18B20” %} temperature sensor operates on the Dallas Semiconductor 1-Wire bus. In this application, we aren’t powering the devices using parasitic power.

Interfacing an ESP32 to an MCP23017 GPIO expander

While the ESP32 sports a number of GPIO pins, not all are broken out on every board, meaning that sometimes a GPIO expander is necessary. This project is a simple design to test interfacing the ESP32 to an MCP23017 via the I2C interface. MCP23017 I2C addressing There are so many tutorials on the MCP23017 that I won’t delve in depth into how it works, but I’ll point out a few features of the custom MCP23017 component that I’m developing as part of this demonstration project.

Using TM1637-based LED displays with ESP32

There are three main types of 4 digit seven segment displays to be found on the market: Bare displays without any driver. These come in a variety of colors and with either decimal points or clock-type display with a colon dividing two sets of two digits. 74HC595-based displays. Usually these displays have two daisy-chained 74HC595 shift registers and rely on the host controller to fill the serial registers and handle the multiplexing.