commandline

sterilize-ng: a command-line URL sterilizer

Introducing sterilize-ng [GitHub link] - a URL sterilizer made to work flexibily on the command line. Background The surveillance capitalist economy is built on the relentless tracking of users. Imagine going about town running errands but everywhere you go, someone is quietly following you. When you pop into the grocery, they examine your receipt. They look into the bags to see what you bought. Then they hop in the car with you and keep careful records of where you go, how fast you drive, whom you talk with on the phone.

Splitting a string on the command line - the search for the one-liner

It seems like the command line is one of those places where you can accomplish crazy efficient things with one-liners. Here’s a perfect use case for a CLI one-liner: In Anki, I often add lists of synonyms and antonyms to my vocabulary cards, but I like them formatted as a bulleted list. My usual route to that involves Markdown. But how to convert this: известный, точный, определённый, достоверный to - `известный` - `точный` - `определённый` - `достоверный` After trying to come up with a single text replacement strategy to make this work, the best I could do was this:

sed matching whitespace on macOS

sed is such a useful pattern-matching and substitution tool for work on the command line. But there’s a little quirk on macOS that will trip you up. It tripped me up. On most platforms, \s is the character class for whitespace. It’s ubiquitous in regexes. But on macOS, it doesn’t work. In fact, it silently fails. Consider this bash one-liner which looks like it should work but doesn’t: # should print I am corrupt (W.